Declare a true state of emergency (The Hill)

Several weeks ago, President Trump stated that the opioid crisis was a “national emergency.” To many of us in public health, it was a confusing statement. Just a few days earlier, the president and Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price stated that they would not declare a state of emergency, claiming that emergencies are time-bound and resource-finite situations.

As an emergency physician and Commissioner of Health in Baltimore City — where approximately two people a day die from overdose — I can tell you that is not the case. Addiction is a disease, treatment exists and communities around the country are succeeding in fighting the epidemic.

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Health Commissioner Dr. Wen Declares Code Blue Alert Extension until Saturday, January 6, 2018

BALTIMORE, MD (January 1, 2018) — Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen extended a Code Blue declaration for Baltimore City through the morning of Saturday, January 6.

Trump to issue opioid 'emergency' declaration. Maryland leaders hope it prompts real change. (Baltimore Sun)

“A state of emergency is long overdue,” said Baltimore Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen, a national voice on the issue. “Imagine if this was ebola and there were over 100 people dying a day. There’d be no question.”

To read the story, click here.

Trump declares opioids 'public health emergency,'; Commissioner Wen urges stronger action (Baltimore Business Journal)

The Trump Administration declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency on Thursday. But Baltimore's Health Commissioner said that's not enough.

To read the story, click here.