Bad Batch App Notifies Community of Heroin Overdoses (Baltimore Magazine)

A local tech entrepreneur is trying to curb the massive spike in deaths related to the opioid epidemic one text at a time.

The Bad Batch Alert app is made for heroin addicts and their loved ones and essentially notifies them of any bad batches of opioids in the area. When an abnormal amount of overdoses in a neighborhood is detected, a text is sent out alerting users that a bad batch is in the area.

“It’s similar to an Amber Alert,” says creator Mike LeGrand, who started up Code In Schools in order to spread computer science education around Baltimore.

With the help of six teens and one mentor from that program, they started up Bad Batch Alert in October. He says, “Loved ones might use it, because they often care more about the people in the grips of addiction, than the people themselves do.”

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 The health commissioner of Baltimore City made a statement Thursday in a Facebook post about the suit filed against the Trump administration for “intentionally and unlawfully sabotaging the Affordable Care Act.

“I am gravely concerned for the wellbeing of my patients, my city and millions of individuals who are finding themselves unable to afford health care,” Dr. Leana Wen, city health commissioner, said.

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'Code Red' announced for Baltimore Wednesday, cooling centers to open (WBFF)

Baltimore's health commissioner is announcing a "Code Red" extreme heat alert for the city for Wednesday and opening cooling centers.

Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen notes the heat index is expected to be higher than 100 degrees, as the heat wave hangs on.

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On Health Matters, Cities Are Increasingly Going to Court (Governing)

Cities used to stay out of courtroom battles over health, leaving that role predominantly to state governments. In the 1990s, states sued the tobacco industry and won more than $200 billion for the damages it had done to public health. States have filed lawsuits against and in defense of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

But in recent years, more and more cities have been going to court.

Read the entire story.