It's hot. But it's far from being a record (Baltimore Sun)

No doubt about it, it’s the traditional hot Artscape weekend. But the National Weather Service says we’re not in record-setting territory. On Friday afternoon, thermometers at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport were showing 93 degrees. That felt like 100, taking humidity into account. But Dan Hofmann, a weather service meteorologist, said record temperatures this time of year are especially high.

The highest recorded for July 21 in Baltimore was 104 degrees in 1930. Records for July 22 and July 23 were set in 2011 when the temperature reached 106 and 102 degrees, respectively. Hofmann said we’re in for more hot weather through the weekend, as thousands of people head into the streets of Mount Vernon and Station North for Artscape.

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