Measles Case Confirmed; Possible Exposures in Baltimore Area

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

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Measles Case Confirmed; Possible Exposures in Baltimore Area

Those potentially exposed are cautioned to be aware of symptoms

Baltimore, MD – On April 5, the Maryland Department of Health (MDH) confirmed a measles case in a Maryland resident.

The Department wants to inform anyone who visited 4000 Old Court Road in Pikesville, MD on Tuesday, April 2 in Baltimore County, that they may have been exposed to measles. Possible exposure times were from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. that day. Individuals who may have been exposed at additional locations are being notified directly.

Measles is a contagious vaccine-preventable viral infection which is easily spread to unvaccinated persons through coughing, sneezing and secretions from the mouth. The measles virus may remain in the air for up to two hours.

People, especially those who are not vaccinated against measles, who were at 4000 Old Court Rd should monitor themselves for any early symptoms of measles, especially fever. People who develop a fever or other symptoms of measles should contact their health care provider. Those with symptoms should not go to child care, school, work or out in public, as they might have the early symptoms of measles and might be contagious. People with these symptoms should call their doctor about their symptoms before showing up in the waiting room so that the office can take measures to prevent spread to other patients.

Measles symptoms typically develop 10-14 days after exposure to the virus, but can develop as soon as seven days and as long as 21 days after exposure. Early symptoms of measles are fever more than 101F; runny nose; cough; and red, watery eyes. Usually, one to four days after the early symptoms, a red rash appears on the face and spreads to the rest of the body. A person with measles is contagious beginning four days before the rash appears until four days after the rash begins. People are considered immune to measles if they were born in the United States before 1957, previously had measles or have had two measles vaccine shots.

Those who are most at risk of complications from measles infection are: pregnant women, infants less than one year old, and those who are immune compromised. Such persons who might have been exposed on April 2 should consult with their healthcare provider to see whether or not treatment with a medicine called Immune Globulin, which can help prevent measles if given within six days of exposure, is indicated.

There was one confirmed measles cases reported in Maryland in 2018, which was a travel-related case imported from the country of Georgia.

Additional information is available on the CDC website here.

 

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