BCHD Interns Discuss Zika Virus with University of Maryland Baltimore Police Officers

BCHD interns Vernon and Taylor present about the Zika virus

Taylor Owens and Vernon Stepney, two BCHD interns who are rising juniors at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, conducted a Zika presentation to the University of Maryland Baltimore Police Department. During the presentation, the students discussed ways that Baltimoreans can protect themselves from the virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses.

Most people with Zika don’t have symptoms at all. About 1 in 5 people will have symptoms such as fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis (red eyes) or headaches. Most people will have a mild infection, which require no hospitalization and go away on their own. The Zika virus is a concern for all Baltimoreans because it can spread from a pregnant person to the fetus, causing serious birth defects. The virus is very easy to pass from one person to another.

Here are some tips to stay protected:

  1. Use insect repellent on anyone over the age of 2 months
  2. Wear light weight, long-sleeved shirts and pants
  3. Use condoms during sex
  4. Eliminate standing water in your house and neighborhood
  5. Do not travel to areas with Zika

Baltimoreans can also help by becoming a Zika Ambassador. Zika Ambassadors are essential to spreading awareness about the virus to their community. Once becoming an ambassador, you will receive a certification from the Health Department when training and activities are completed.

To learn more about becoming a Zika Ambassador, Click here.  

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