Why the Trump administration is cutting teen pregnancy prevention funding (CNN)

Most teenagers feel uncomfortable talking about sex, but not 16-year-old Bryanna Ely.

As a youth leader for the Buffalo, New York-based teen pregnancy prevention program HOPE Buffalo, Ely talks to not only other teens but also adults. She explains how they can help teens when it comes to their emotional, physical and sexual health, abstinence and birth control.
"It's definitely made me more comfortable around health providers, because I was very nervous and not willing to talk about it, but then once I joined HOPE Buffalo, it's an easy subject to talk about. Well, not that easy, but it's easy enough to talk about that I don't feel so uncomfortable," said Ely, who will be entering her junior year in high school this month.
 
While volunteering with HOPE Buffalo at a local community center, Ely said, she remembered meeting another teenage girl, sharing sexual health information with her and feeling like she made a difference. "She took in all the information, and she said she would not get pregnant until she was 28 or 30," Ely said. "I joined HOPE Buffalo because I wanted to make a change in my community and make sure that these teenagers who didn't have a voice had a voice." Yet federal funding for such teen pregnancy prevention programs in the United States is now on the chopping block.
 

Read the entire story. 

Related Stories

Baltimore Health Commissioner Posts Statement On ACA Lawsuit (WJZ)

 The health commissioner of Baltimore City made a statement Thursday in a Facebook post about the suit filed against the Trump administration for “intentionally and unlawfully sabotaging the Affordable Care Act.

“I am gravely concerned for the wellbeing of my patients, my city and millions of individuals who are finding themselves unable to afford health care,” Dr. Leana Wen, city health commissioner, said.

Read the entire story.

'Code Red' announced for Baltimore Wednesday, cooling centers to open (WBFF)

Baltimore's health commissioner is announcing a "Code Red" extreme heat alert for the city for Wednesday and opening cooling centers.

Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen notes the heat index is expected to be higher than 100 degrees, as the heat wave hangs on.

Read the entire story.

 

On Health Matters, Cities Are Increasingly Going to Court (Governing)

Cities used to stay out of courtroom battles over health, leaving that role predominantly to state governments. In the 1990s, states sued the tobacco industry and won more than $200 billion for the damages it had done to public health. States have filed lawsuits against and in defense of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

But in recent years, more and more cities have been going to court.

Read the entire story.