"Meet Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City’s New Health Commissioner" (Baltimore Fishbowl) March 30, 2015

Last January, Dr. Leana S. Wen took the reins from Dr. Oxiris Barbot as Baltimore City Health Commissioner.  Being responsible for the health of the entire city seems like a gargantuan charge, especially for someone barely 30. But given Wen’s accomplishments to date—she entered college at 13, studied public health and health policy as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, served on an advisory commission to Congress regarding graduate medical education, worked as an attending physician in a busy emergency room, gave four popular TED and TEDMed talks, wrote a critically-acclaimed book When Doctor’s Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests, to name a few—she’s probably up to the task.

"Baltimore Health Commissioner Leads Coalition of Physicians and Public Health Advocates In Support of State Ban On Powdered Alcohol (Palcohol)"

Citing the potential dangers of powdered alcohol for both youth and adults, Baltimore City Health Commissioner Leana Wen, M.D. has convened a coalition of public health and physician leaders in support of banning the substance in Maryland. “Our efforts need to be focused on making alcoholic products less, not more, available to young people across our state,” Dr Wen said. 

"Mayor and Health Commissioner Honor Four Baltimore Adults and Eight Youths As “Baltimorphosis Changemakers” Against Youth Violence"

Today as part of National Youth Violence Prevention Week, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake and Health Commissioner Leana Wen, M.D. recognized the accomplishments of 12 city residents who are “changemakers” in the community by presenting them with a 2015 Baltimorphosis Changemaker award.  

"Health Commissioner Seeking Community Engagement as City Prepares to Expand B’more for Healthy Babies to Kids and Teenagers" (Afro American) March 19, 2015

Community input will be key as the city looks to expand its successful B’more for Healthy Babies initiative to kids and teenagers. This is being done to reduce racially disparate outcomes in health, says new Baltimore City Health Department Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen. 

"With Half of the City’s Hypothermia Deaths Involving Alcohol Intoxication,Health Commissioner Issues Warning: Alcohol and Cold Temperatures Do Not Mix And Can Be Deadly"

Baltimore City Health Commissioner Leana Wen, M.D. is reminding Baltimoreans of the dangers of alcohol use during cold weather. Baltimore remains under a Severe Code Blue declaration through 12 p.m. Saturday; the wind chill this evening will be around zero degrees and temperatures are expected to remain dangerously cold through approximately lunchtime on Saturday.  There have been 8 deaths in Baltimore due to hypothermia this season and 31 statewide. Alcohol intoxication was a contributing factor in half of the deaths in Baltimore.  “Drinking alcohol can be life-threatening for individuals in temperatures that are this low,” Dr. Wen said.  

"Baltimore City Health Commissioner Calls Increasing Cost Of Naloxone a “Public Health Crisis”; Issues Support For Inquiry Launched By Representative Cummings"

Baltimore City Health Commissioner Leana Wen, M.D. today applauded two congressional leaders, including Maryland Representative Elijah E. Cummings, for their inquiry into increasing prices charged by one manufacturer of naloxone. Increasing the availability of naloxone, a medication used to safely reverse opioid overdoses, is a key component of Baltimore’s strategy to combat overdose deaths.

"Baltimore City Health Department's Staying Alive Program" (FOX45) February 26, 2015

Baltimore City Health Department's "Staying Alive Program" has trained more than 12,000 people to use Naloxone in the program's 11 years. Naloxone, also known as Narcan, is a heroin overdose reversal drug. "Some of these individuals don't have to die. We have drugs out here--Naloxone--that can save a lot of lives," Needle Exchange Program Acting Director Derrick Hunt said. "A lot of our success comes from taking our services to the individuals."

"Health Commissioner Issues Reminder That Running Water Is Critically Important For All Food Service Facilities"

In light of the cold weather causing water main breaks and broken water pipes across the city, the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) is issuing a reminder that all food service facilities must have operating hot and cold water readily available according to state regulations.  “Having both hot and cold running water is essential for any business that is preparing or serving food to the public,” said Baltimore City Health Commissioner Leana Wen, M.D

"Baltimore City teen birth rate down by nearly 33%" (WMAR-ABC2) February 25, 2015

Rebecca Dineen isn't surprised unintended teen pregnancies in Baltimore City are going down. In fact, she's part of the group responsible for the 32.6 percent drop since 2009.  "One of the biggest issues in Baltimore City was an equity of access issue to all contraceptive methods," said Dineen, of B'more for Healthy Babies, an initiative of the Baltimore City Health Department.

"Teen pregnancies in Baltimore drop by a third"

Baltimore's teen pregnancy rate dropped by nearly a third from 2009 to 2013, far surpassing the city's goal for reducing the rate, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to announce today. "One of our top priorities in public health in the city is teen pregnancy," said Leana Wen, Baltimore City health commissioner. "I think it is a testament to what can happen in our city when all of us work together on this common goal."

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