President Trump’s 'state of emergency' — a health commissioner's perspective (The Hill)

On Thursday, President Trump announced that he was declaring the opioid epidemic to be a public health emergency, rather than a national state of emergency. As a public health official on the frontlines of this epidemic, I am surprised and disappointed by the limited scale of this declaration. 

Most importantly, the declaration comes with no specific funding. National state of emergency declarations come with commitments for new funding, not a request to repurpose existing funds. When natural disasters strike, funds aren’t removed from the community that is already hit hard in order to rebuild infrastructure. It does not make sense to take resources away from other health priorities to fight this epidemic.

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The youngest victims of the opioid epidemic (Axios)

In a video covering the opioid epidemic and highlighting babies born with withdrawal symptoms, Dr. Wen addresses another issue in combatting the crisis.

"When addiction seemed to affect poor people of color in inner cities, it was seen as a moral failing - a choice. Unless we address these deep rooted issues, we’re not going to make progress in treating addiction as the disease that we know it to be."

Watch the video here.