Baltimore declares Code Red heat advisory for Thursday (WBAL)

The Baltimore City Health Department has declared a Code Red heat advisory Thursday with a heat index around 105 degrees expected.

The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory for noon to 8 p.m. Thursday for areas east of the Interstate 95 corridor and Maryland's Eastern Shore. A heat advisory means that a period of high temperatures is expected. Temperatures will be in the mid to upper 90s. The combination of high temperatures and high humidity could create a situation in which heat illnesses are possible.

"Heat is a silent killer and a public health threat, particularly for the young, the elderly and those in our city who are the most vulnerable," Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen said. "With (Thursday's) extreme heat expected, it is important for all residents to protect against hyperthermia and dehydration. Please be cautious and remember to stay cool and hydrated."

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